18 Historic Homes In Ann Arbor Michigan

There are lots of wonderful places and beautiful attractions around Ann Arbor. The bustling city is the home of many historic buildings and architecture that you can’t find anywhere else. Below is a list of historic homes in Ann Arbor that are listed at the National Register of Historic Places. Check them out and be amazed by their uniqueness and picturesque traits.

William Anderson House

Built in c. 1853 and significant for fine details of its Greek Revival styling, although it also has elements more common to the Gothic Revival. Home of Washtenaw’s first sheriff (1835-39).

William Anderson House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Bell-Spalding House

Bell-Spalding House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Henry Bennett House

Henry Bennett House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Delta Upsilon Fraternity House

Delta Upsilon Fraternity House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

William B. and Mary Shuford Palmer House

The William B. and Mary Shuford Palmer House is a multilevel brick and cypress late period Frank Lloyd Wright house, the plan and design of which is based on the equilateral triangle. The house is sheltered by a long broad hipped roof with deep overhangs; a cantilever extending over the terrace is the most dramatic feature of the house. The home was designed in 1952 for William Palmer, an economics professor at the University of Michigan, and his wife Mary.

William B. and Mary Shuford Palmer House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Earl House

Thomas Earl House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Henry S. Frieze House

Henry S. Frieze House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Arnold and Gertrude Goss House

Arnold and Gertrude Goss House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Dr. Benajah Ticknor House

The Benajah Ticknor House (now the Cobblestone Farm and Museum) is an 1844 cobblestone farmhouse built by Dr. Benajah Ticknor, a naval surgeon. The surrounding area was farmed from 1824 until 1955, and in 1972 the city of Ann Arbor turned it into a museum.

Dr. Benajah Ticknor House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Jacob Hoffstetter House

Jacob Hoffstetter House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Kellogg-Warden House

Kellogg-Warden House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Floyd R. Mechem House

Floyd R. Mechem House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Orrin White House

The Orrin White House is a two-story frame house covered with cobblestones, set in a herringbone pattern on the front facade. It was between 1836 and 1840 by Orrin and Ann White, and is still used as a private residence.

Orrin White House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Robert C. and Bettie J. (Sponseller) Metcalf House

Robert C. and Bettie J. (Sponseller) Metcalf House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

William and Elizabeth (Bodanzky) Muschenheim House

William and Elizabeth (Bodanzky) Muschenheim House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Newberry Hall

Newberry Hall

Image By Dave Parker (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

President’s House, University Of Michigan

President's House, University Of Michigan

Image By Dave Parker (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Judge Robert S. Wilson House

The Judge Robert S. Wilson House, a two-story Greek Revival structure built in approximately 1839, is an outstanding specimen of classical design. The front facade boasts a full-width portico with Ionic fluted shaft columns, and an entryway framed by matching pilasters.

Judge Robert S. Wilson House

Image By Andrew Jameson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

 

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